Maker Spaces: Appleton Maker Space Tour

Last week I traveled to Appleton, Wisconsin and visited the MakerSpace located there. It was located in a small building behind a hair salon. It is a great place for members to tinker, fabricate and collaborate in making projects that appeal to them. Each month members pay a fee to have access to all of the equipment, materials and storage located in the space. The president of the organization, Chris, gave me a tour. There were several large work areas for woodworking, metal work, electronics, planning and storage. All were equipped with the machines for an inventor to do hands on learning.

A maker space is a great space to have access to all of the various machines needed to invent at a fraction of the cost of purchasing these on your own. There were lathes, saws, planers, welders, drill presses, and many more machines that could be useful for anyone wishing to be creative. I really liked their planning room that had a floor to ceiling whiteboard that was 12 feet wide and 8 feet wide. Members can use the board for drawing, creating lists or planning a project.

Chris introduced me to one of the members who is building an airplane in the space. He had the frame and wheels already made and was working on the wings. It reminded me of the old days when early flight pioneers made airplanes in their garages.

Craft Stick Truss Bridgeu

These are the kinds of spaces that we need in schools! We don’t need
all of the fancy and expensive equipment, but we do need areas where students can invent, create, fabricate, and experience failure and success. A corner of a classroom with craft sticks, glue guns, wires, light bulbs, and any number of inexpensive items helps children use their hands and minds to invent. Let’s get away from this culture of constant testing and get back to the real world!

Hydroponics 101.2: The Kratky Method

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Hydroponics gives your students an opportunity for hands on, authentic learning that is novel, STEM related and gives them a chance to tinker. We’re currently exploring Hydroponics and Aquaponics in a blog series (read Hydroponics 101.1).

Choosing the container that you wish to use for your hydroponic system is crucial. There are two ways that you can approach this. You can either place your plant in a container that has no water and nutrient movement which is Kratky method) or you can re-circulate the water continuously using a pump and aerator. Which method you choose depends on your space and budget.

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With either method, you should begin your plants two to three weeks before transplanting them into your hydroponic system.

In the Kratky method you mix your nutrients in water and fill a container. Next, you prevent light from shining on the solution by duct taping or painting the container, then you cut a hole in the top of the container for your plant basket and you set the plant into the container with some of the roots not immersed in the liquid so they can get oxygen from the air. The upside is that you can grow lettuce and quick maturing plants in about 30 days. The downside is that the nutrient solution will run out or will begin to smell after about a month because no aeration of the solution takes place. This method is simple.

It is very important not to let light hit the solution or algae will begin to grow and use up all of the nutrients meant for your plant. This method is great for windowsill gardens or in small spaces that receive sunlight most of the day.

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I’ve noticed some differences with each method. First, root development is much greater in the circulation method and plants do grow a bit larger (see photo comparison). Secondly, the nutrient solution can be used for a longer period of time due to aeration. I have eaten my lettuce from both systems and both salads tasted very good.

Next week I will tackle a circulating system. But before then we’ll be posting on adding fish to our high school aquaponics system!